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2018

Cover Page

Vol 87, No 3 (2018)

On the cover The specimen of Dicranum polysetum Sw. from S. B. Gorski‘s bryophyte collection in the Herbarium of Vilnius University (WI). It was collected in 1834 in the forest surrounded by the Neris River (currently the Vingis Park, Vilnius). Stanisław Batys Gorski (1802–1864) was a pharmacist, botanist, and entomologist. His bryological collection in WI contains 729 specimens. This is probably a part of the collection described in Gorski‘s manuscript as “Herbarium generale Polonicum et Lithuanicum”. It also includes the material collected or received by exchange during Gorski’s travels to Central and Southern Europe. In 2016, the collection was reassembled and revised.

[Author: Mindaugas Rasimavičius]

Note from the Editor The correct name of this great naturalist and collector is Stanisław Batys Górski. It can be seen in his handwriting on the photograph dedicated to his colleague Józef Warszewicz (Köhler 2014, Acta Baltica Historiae et Philosophiae Scientiarum Vol. 2, No. 1, DOI: 10.11590/abhps.2014.1.02). The commonly used version of the last name: Gorski, is simplified.

Beata Zagórska-Marek

Cover Page

Vol 87, No 2 (2018)

On the cover Magnolia obovata Thunb. In this particular flower, calyx phenotype (green tissue) is limited to the sector of the sepal otherwise expressing a corolla phenotype. It implies chimeric character of floral genes expression patterns. A progressive trait of perianth differentiation in some magnolias has been recently confirmed by molecular-genetic studies.

[Author: Beata Zagórska-Marek]

Cover Page

Vol 87, No 1 (2018)

On the cover Cinnamomum camphora Ness et Eberm. – transverse section through the young stem exposes the surface of the cut to the air. This in seconds induces the appearance of a deep red stain but only in cambial cells and their youngest phloem derivatives. The nature of this natural reaction is not known.

[Author: Beata Zagórska-Marek]


2017

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Vol 86, No 4 (2017)

On the cover Lateral branch of Wollemia nobilis W. G. Jones, K. D. Hill & J. M. Allen terminating in a male cone. The tree is a hero of fantastic story telling how the Jurassic gymnosperm became an extant plant. Now recommended as a new Christmas tree. This specimen, grown outdoors near Wrocław town in Lower Silesia, Poland, produced many cones last summer, but had to be moved indoors for the winter.

[Author: Beata Zagórska-Marek]

Cover Page

Vol 86, No 3 (2017)

On the cover The oldest field maple (Acer campestre L.) in Poland. It grows in the park which surrounds the mansion erected in fifteenth century by the members of Dobrzycki noble family, in Dobrzyca (Great Poland Province). Planted in 1680 measures 637 cm in girth. It is protected by law as the Monument of Nature No. 240.

[Author: Beata Zagórska-Marek]

Cover Page

Vol 86, No 2 (2017)

On the cover The inner life of the leaf. Formation of the hairy gall in the beech leaf by the gall midge Hartigiola annulipes (Diptera, Cecidomyiidae): the early stage (left) and the fully developed gall (right).

[Author: Edyta Gola]

Cover Page

Vol 86, No 1 (2017)

On the cover Regardless of who I am: Anemone or Hepatica, I announce with my heavenly blue that the spring has come to the woodlands.

[Author: Beata Zagórska-Marek]


2016

Cover Page

Vol 85, No 4 (2016): Phyllotaxis and related topics

On the cover A computer simulation of phyllotactic transition frequent in the main axes of dicotyledonous plants and in lateral shoots of conifers. Rectangular simulation space represents the split-open surface of cylindrical shoot, stacked disks – the primordia of lateral organs. The initial 2:2 decussate phyllotaxis (GREEN DOMAIN) transforms into 2:3 helical one (BLUE DOMAIN) through addition of one parastichy inclined to the left (γ-dislocation). This is due to quite rapid, yet continuous decrease in the size of primordia (RED DOMAIN), changing their identity from cotyledons or prophylls (GREEN) to the leaf proper (BLUE).

[Author: Beata Zagórska-Marek]

Cover Page

Vol 85, No 3 (2016)

On the cover Fireworks in the plant world – vascular bundles in Selaginella kraussiana labeled with Texas Red.

[Author: Edyta M. Gola]

Cover Page

Vol 85, No 2 (2016)

On the cover Autofluorescence of chlorophyll in two chloroplasts of unicellular green alga Netrium sp. (Zygnematales). Their elaborate shapes with deep ridges giving stellate appearance in cross-section of the cell, have been visualized here by using focus stacking technique.

[Author: Magda Turzańska]

Cover Page

Vol 85, No 1 (2016)

On the cover Winter’s good-bye – a cherry tree in the orchard wearing the lace of icicles.

[Author: Beata Zagórska-Marek]


2015

Cover Page

Vol 84, No 4 (2015)

On the cover Remembering summer roses – bright and beautiful winter flowers of Camellia sasanqua Thunb.; the plant, native to Japan, grows there in the mountains high, but also in the gardens, where it blossoms till February, often under the cover of a white snow; its evergreen shiny leaves are used for making tea.

[Author: Beata Zagórska-Marek]

Cover Page

Vol 84, No 3 (2015)

On the cover The swallowtail butterfly (Papilio machaon L.) studying the mysteries of wild teasel inflorescence (Dipsacus fullonum L.). The first one is bijugate phyllotaxis emerging typically from the initial decussate one. The second is  bi-directional blooming, which starts from the equatorial area of the inflorescence. The regulatory mechanism of this peculiar behavior remains unknown.

[Author: Beata Zagórska-Marek]

Cover Page

Vol 84, No 2 (2015)

On the cover Clematis ×jackmanii Moore – aberrant flower with the symptoms of meristic variation in the region of perianth. In addition, one half the tepal seen in a front (discolored) is a mosaic of the cell clones having different identities – of a tepal and of a leaf.

[Author: Beata Zagórska-Marek]

Cover Page

Vol 84, No 1 (2015)

On the cover Galanthus nivalis 'Flore Pleno' resembles to some extent the floral mutant agamous of Arabidopsis thaliana. Its multiplied perianth contains, however, some remnants of generative structures. The male, pollen producing stripes of sporogenic tissue can be seen on the adaxial surface of some inner perianth parts. The trimery of the outer parts, typical for the snowdrop, is often replaced by the teramery or even pentamery, which makes 'Flore Pleno' an attractive example of meristic variation.

[Authors: Beata Zagórska-Marek, Magdalena Turzańska]


2014

Cover Page

Vol 83, No 4 (2014): Evolution of plant cells

On the cover The sacoglossan sea slug Elysia timida – these slugs are the only animals known to perform photosynthesis using plastids they sequester from their algal food source, in this case the green alga Acetabularia. The stolen plastids (kleptoplasts) can remain photosynthetically active for months in the cytosol of the animals’ cells. 

[Authors: Jan de Vries and Steffen Köhler (CAi Düsseldorf)]

Cover Page

Vol 83, No 3 (2014)

On the cover Brachytecium reflexum (Starke) Br. Eur. – moss gametophyte à la Polonaise, world champion of playing with colors.

[Author: Magdalena Turzańska]

Cover Page

Vol 83, No 2 (2014)

On the cover Pointillism by liverworts: equally bilobed, lateral leaves of Cephalozia bicuspidata gametophyte under fluorescent microscope.

[Author: Magdalena Turzańska]

Cover Page

Vol 83, No 1 (2014)

On the cover Meaningful Colors. Golden and blue fluorescence of berberine stained stem leaves and paraphyllia of Thuidium tamariscinum (Hedw.) Br. Eur. differentiates unipapillose cells of the leaf blade from those building up the nerves. [Author: Magdalena Turzańska]

On the cover we present new ASBP logo, a symbol of our journal activity, publishing continuously the results of research. It pertains to indeterminate growth of the plant apical meristem producing lateral organ primordia in a regular sequence. The primordia layout is unique. It is rarely observed in nature transient state between two consecutive expressions of the main Fibonacci phyllotaxis.


2013

Cover Page

Vol 82, No 4 (2013)

On the cover Lagging behind the glow of Tiffany Blue – specimen of leafy liverwort Nowellia curvifolia (Dics.) Mitt., collected by Wiesław Fałtynowicz in Wigry National Park, Poland, observed under UV in fluorescent microscope. Blue fluorescence of the youngest parts of growing gametophyte is probably due to a dense cytoplasmic content of the cells. These contrast nicely with the berberine stained, amber cell walls of the older leaves and rhizoids.

[Author: Magdalena Turzańska]

Cover Page

Vol 82, No 3 (2013)

On the cover "The Second Life Capsule" – young sporophyte of Sphagnum sp. protected by perichaetial leaves of capitulum's lateral branch.

[Author: Magdalena Turzańska]

Cover Page

Vol 82, No 2 (2013)

On the cover Glimpse through the Nature’s stained glass window – autofluorescence of the fertile layer of Mnium hornum Hedw. male gametophyte with erected antheridia and paraphyses embraced by the uppermost leaf.

[Author: Magdalena Turzańska]

Cover Page

Vol 82, No 1 (2013)

On the cover Masterpiece of Nature – lacy cellular structure of a tiny, leafy liverwort Lepidozia reptans (L.) Dum., viewed from the ventral side of its pinnately branched stem, visualized by autofluorescence of the cell walls.

[Author: Magdalena Turzańska]

 

2012

Cover Page

Vol 81, No 4 (2012): Ethnobotany of wild food plants

On the cover Bracken (Pteridium aquilinum) fronds served boiled and sprinkled with oil, chilli and garlic. Houzhenzi, Shaanxi, China, 2011.

[Photograph: Łukasz Łuczaj]

Cover Page

Vol 81, No 3 (2012)

On the cover Autofluorescence of lignified cell walls reveals discontinuous cambium and secondary growth in Arabidopsis thaliana wildtype (WT) plant's inflorescence.

[Authors: Beata Zagórska-Marek and Magdalena Turzańska]


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